Cartoony humans

These two are from the clown act Aga Boom, here performing in Cirque du Soleil’s “O”. The person in the yellow robe is particularly fun to watch. I now think this person is a woman. Her poses are very strong, nice crisp motion. Her big shoes give in a strong grounding the way Mickey Mouse’s do. The Iceberg looks like it came out of a Chilly Willy cartoon. There is no story, but they are silly, profane, frightened, imaginative and romantic in a limited space and limited time. Their character is greater than their situation.

Jimmy Slonina

Jimmy Slonina is my kind of performer. I discovered him when one of his lip sync videos showed up on Boing Boing. Here are three of those. These are great for watching how faces move, but equally, if you are creating lip sync you might want to create reference that goes to this level.



Playful characters

Recently I’ve been thinking about conventional wisdom in creating stories. What I mean by conventional wisdom, is the stuff I’ve seen in blog posts, giving direction to animators in creating stories.  Some of it comes from Kurt Vonnegut’s advice to writers. Rather than go into the entire list, I’ll paraphrase the basic ideas that I want to comment on.

  1. Make the character want something.
  2. Be a sadist to the character.  Throw all kinds of problems at them to see what they are made of.
  3. Have them overcome the obstacles.

All of that is valid advice for starting stories.  However, I’m concerned that some people will start to think of these as “rules”.   People like Kurt Vonnegut and Robert Mckee, who wrote the book “Story”, are giving advice to writers, not animators.  Animators create characters, and not all characters follow the rules.   I’m thinking of characters I will call “Playful.”

For instance, consider Bugs Bunny.    Bugs doesn’t want anything.  Some people will argue that Bugs Bunny wants to be left alone, but I consider that to be nothing.  Elmer Fudd wants something.  He wants to kill the rabbit for food.   Elmer is also the one who is faced with the many obstacles to his goal.  The obstacles created by Bugs.   Bugs becomes the sadist.   Following the above advice, Elmer should be the protagonist.  But Bugs Bunny is the character people come to see.

Bugs easily masters the situation with Elmer, or Yosemite Sam, or whoever.  Charlie Chaplin’s tramp is the same sort of character.   While he is usually poor and needy, and he faces challenges from bad guys, he so easily controls the situation, there is never much doubt he will succeed.

Playful characters are full of life, and energy, and wit.  They are bold.  They are confident.  They do not shy away from challenges.  They engage in the situation and master it with style.  From the clever servants in old theatrical comedy to the Marx Brothers to Ace Ventura, such characters are performers who run the show, not puppets of the godlike writer.  These are the characters this blog is concerned with.

What inspired the word “playful” was this quote by Johannes Galli, from his book Clown: Joy of Failure.

The clown should never be mistaken for being obstinate. Contrariness provokes an encounter, but the clown is seeking an encounter, because he wants to play.

The literary protagonist, who yearns for one thing, and ultimately gets it, is satisfied, and done.  The playful character is never satisfied, he is always ready to play again.  And audiences will come back for more.

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